Can Gamification lead to Increase Paid Crowdworkers Output?

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						@Select Types{,
							 
							 
							 
							 
							 
							Journal   = "Band-1",
							 Title= "Can Gamification lead to Increase Paid Crowdworkers Output?", 
							Author= "Sascha Lichtenberg, Tim-Benjamin Lembcke, Mattheus Brening, Alfred Benedikt Brendel and Simon Trang", 
							Doi= "https://doi.org/10.30844/wi_2020_k4-lichtenberg", 
							 Abstract= "Gamifying serious work environments, such as paid crowdsourcing platforms, potentially increases crowdworkers’ task motivation, engagement and enjoyment. This, in turn, can lead to a higher willingness to contribute, higher quality of work and long-term engagement. However, it remains unclear how crowdworkers behave, when gamification is applied to motivate them to do more tasks than being paid for. In this study, we conducted an experiment on Amazon Mechanical Turk to investigate this context in a controlled setting, enabling the isolation of gamification effects. With 320 crowdworkers, we study the effect of different gamification affordances (progressbars, badges and leaderboards) on autonomous motivation and task performed. We find that some gamification affordances (namely badges and leaderboard) can lead crowdworkers to do more work than they are paid for. However, this is not necessarily linked to autonomous motivation because we did not consistently observe an increase in autonomous motivate together with more performed tasks.", 
							 Keywords= "Crowdworking, Gamfication, Motivation, Autonomous Motivation", 
							}
					
Sascha Lichtenberg, Tim-Benjamin Lembcke, Mattheus Brening, Alfred Benedikt Brendel and Simon Trang: Can Gamification lead to Increase Paid Crowdworkers Output?. Online: https://doi.org/10.30844/wi_2020_k4-lichtenberg (Abgerufen 17.04.24)

Abstract

Abstract

Gamifying serious work environments, such as paid crowdsourcing platforms, potentially increases crowdworkers’ task motivation, engagement and enjoyment. This, in turn, can lead to a higher willingness to contribute, higher quality of work and long-term engagement. However, it remains unclear how crowdworkers behave, when gamification is applied to motivate them to do more tasks than being paid for. In this study, we conducted an experiment on Amazon Mechanical Turk to investigate this context in a controlled setting, enabling the isolation of gamification effects. With 320 crowdworkers, we study the effect of different gamification affordances (progressbars, badges and leaderboards) on autonomous motivation and task performed. We find that some gamification affordances (namely badges and leaderboard) can lead crowdworkers to do more work than they are paid for. However, this is not necessarily linked to autonomous motivation because we did not consistently observe an increase in autonomous motivate together with more performed tasks.

Keywords

Schlüsselwörter

Crowdworking, Gamfication, Motivation, Autonomous Motivation

References

Referenzen

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