Intelligent Systems and Hospitals: Joint Forces in the Name of Health?

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						@Select Types{,
							 
							 
							 
							 
							 
							Journal   = "Band-1",
							 Title= "Intelligent Systems and Hospitals: Joint Forces in the Name of Health?", 
							Author= "Luisa Pumplun, Peter Buxmann", 
							Doi= "https://doi.org/10.30844/wi_2020_f8-pumplun", 
							 Abstract= "In recent times, intelligent systems based on artificial intelligence have gained relevance for a variety of industries. Their potential is particularly high in healthcare, where they could be used for prevention, diagnosis and follow-up-care. However, their adoption requires that healthcare delivery organizations are able to integrate the new technology into their processes, systems, and values – a task, that most hospitals have not yet been able to accomplish. To learn more about this issue, we conducted a systematic literature search and found, that little is known regarding the specific aspects that influence hospitals to continuously adopt intelligent systems. Based on this finding and drawing on the TOE and NASSS framework, we want to conduct semi-structured expert interviews with hospital management and physicians. The aim of our research is to analyse the specific requirements of hospitals and thus contribute to a theoretical foundation of intelligent systems’ persistent adoption.
", 
							 Keywords= "Artificial Intelligence, Intelligent Systems, Hospitals, Adoption, Implementation", 
							}
					
Luisa Pumplun, Peter Buxmann: Intelligent Systems and Hospitals: Joint Forces in the Name of Health?. Online: https://doi.org/10.30844/wi_2020_f8-pumplun (Abgerufen 22.05.24)

Abstract

Abstract

In recent times, intelligent systems based on artificial intelligence have gained relevance for a variety of industries. Their potential is particularly high in healthcare, where they could be used for prevention, diagnosis and follow-up-care. However, their adoption requires that healthcare delivery organizations are able to integrate the new technology into their processes, systems, and values – a task, that most hospitals have not yet been able to accomplish. To learn more about this issue, we conducted a systematic literature search and found, that little is known regarding the specific aspects that influence hospitals to continuously adopt intelligent systems. Based on this finding and drawing on the TOE and NASSS framework, we want to conduct semi-structured expert interviews with hospital management and physicians. The aim of our research is to analyse the specific requirements of hospitals and thus contribute to a theoretical foundation of intelligent systems’ persistent adoption.

Keywords

Schlüsselwörter

Artificial Intelligence, Intelligent Systems, Hospitals, Adoption, Implementation

References

Referenzen

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