Missing Out on Life: Parental Perceptions of Children’s Mobile Technology Use

Bibtex

Cite as text

						@Select Types{,
							 
							 
							 
							 
							 
							Journal   = "Band-1",
							 Title= "Missing Out on Life: Parental Perceptions of Children’s Mobile Technology Use", 
							Author= "Cora Bergert, Antonia Köster Hanna Krasnova and Ofir Turel", 
							Doi= "https://doi.org/10.30844/wi_2020_f1-bergert", 
							 Abstract= "Mobile devices have become an integral part of everyday life due to their portability. As literature shows, technology use is not only beneficial but also has dark sides, such as addiction. Parents face the need to balance perceived benefits and risks of children’s exposure to mobile technologies. However, no study has uncovered what kind of benefits and concerns parents consider when implementing technology-related rules. We built on qualitative responses of 300 parents of children aged two to thirteen to explore concerns about, and perceived benefits of children’s smartphone and tablet usage, as well as the rules parents have developed regarding technology use. Findings point to concerns regarding children’s development, as well as benefits for both children and parents, and ultimately to new insights about mobile technology mediation. These results provide practical guidance for parents, physicians and mobile industry stakeholders, trying to ensure that children are acting responsibly with mobile technology.

", 
							 Keywords= "Mobile Technology, Smartphone, Children, Parental Mediation, Rules
", 
							}
					
Cora Bergert, Antonia Köster Hanna Krasnova and Ofir Turel: Missing Out on Life: Parental Perceptions of Children’s Mobile Technology Use. Online: https://doi.org/10.30844/wi_2020_f1-bergert (Abgerufen 23.05.24)

Abstract

Abstract

Mobile devices have become an integral part of everyday life due to their portability. As literature shows, technology use is not only beneficial but also has dark sides, such as addiction. Parents face the need to balance perceived benefits and risks of children’s exposure to mobile technologies. However, no study has uncovered what kind of benefits and concerns parents consider when implementing technology-related rules. We built on qualitative responses of 300 parents of children aged two to thirteen to explore concerns about, and perceived benefits of children’s smartphone and tablet usage, as well as the rules parents have developed regarding technology use. Findings point to concerns regarding children’s development, as well as benefits for both children and parents, and ultimately to new insights about mobile technology mediation. These results provide practical guidance for parents, physicians and mobile industry stakeholders, trying to ensure that children are acting responsibly with mobile technology.

Keywords

Schlüsselwörter

Mobile Technology, Smartphone, Children, Parental Mediation, Rules

References

Referenzen

1. Bryant, J.A.: Television and the American family. Routledge, New York (2001)
2. The Guardian, https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/dec/13/smartphone-banchildren- sleep-depression-suicide (Accessed: 27.04.2019)
3. Rideout, V.: The Common Sense census: Media use by kids age zero to eight. Common Sense Media (2017)
4. Sanders, W., Parent, J., Forehand, R., Sullivan, A.D., Jones, D.J.: Parental perceptions of technology and technology-focused parenting: associations with youth screen time. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 44, 28-38 (2016)
5. The Washington Post, https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/tabletsproliferate- in-nations-classrooms-and-take-a-swipe-at-the-statusquo/ 2014/05/17/faa27ba4-dbbd-11e3-8009-71de85b9c527_story.html?noredirect=on. (Accessed: 21.08.2019)
6. Mascheroni, G.: Parenting the mobile internet in Italian households: Parents’ and children’s discourses. Journal of Children and Media 8, 440-456 (2014)
7. Blum-Ross, A., Livingstone, S.: Families and screen time: Current advice and emerging research. Media Policy Project, London School of Economics and Political Science (2016)
8. Gladkaya, M., Gundlach, J., Bergert, C., Baumann, A., Krasnova, H.: We Need to Talk! Antecedents and Consequences of Children’s Smartphone Use – A Literature Review. In: Proceedings of the Americas Conference on Information Systems, pp. 1-10. New Orleans, LA (2018)
9. Cho, K.-S., Lee, J.-M.: Influence of smartphone addiction proneness of young children on problematic behaviors and emotional intelligence: Mediating self-assessment effects of parents using smartphones. Computers in Human Behavior 66, 303-311 (2017)
10. Falbe, J., Davison, K.K., Franckle, R.L., Ganter, C., Gortmaker, S.L., Smith, L., Land, T., Taveras, E.M.: Sleep duration, restfulness, and screens in the sleep environment. Pediatrics 135, e367-e375 (2015)
11. Moon, J.H., Kim, K.W., Moon, N.J.: Smartphone use is a risk factor for pediatric dry eye disease according to region and age: a case control study. BMC ophthalmology 16, 188 (2016)
12. World Health Organization: WHO guidelines on physical activity, sedentary behaviour and sleep for children under 5 years of age. World Health Organization, Geneva (2019)
13. Hiniker, A., Schoenebeck, S.Y., Kientz, J.A.: Not at the dinner table: Parents’ and children’s perspectives on family technology rules. In: Proceedings of the 19th ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing, pp. 1376- 1389. ACM, New York (2016)
14. Livingstone, S., Helsper, E.J.: Parental mediation of children’s internet use. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media 52, 581-599 (2008)
15. Jago, R., Edwards, M.J., Urbanski, C.R., Sebire, S.J.: General and specific approaches to media parenting: a systematic review of current measures, associations with screenviewing, and measurement implications. Childhood obesity 9, 51-72 (2013)
16. Jung, Y.: What a smartphone is to me: understanding user values in using smartphones. Information Systems Journal 24, 299-321 (2014)
17. Venkatesh, V., Sykes, T.A., Chan, F.K.Y., Thong, J.Y.L., Hu, P.J.-H.: Children’s Internet Addiction, Family-to-Work Conflict, and Job Outcomes: A Study of Parent–Child Dyads. MIS Quarterly 43, 903-927 (2019)
18. Clark, L.S.: Parental mediation theory for the digital age. Communication theory 21, 323- 343 (2011)
19. Krasnova, H., Widjaja, T., Buxmann, P., Wenninger, H., Benbasat, I.: Research note— why following friends can hurt you: an exploratory investigation of the effects of envy on social networking sites among college-age users. Information systems research 26, 585- 605 (2015)
20. Beaudry, A., Pinsonneault, A.: The other side of acceptance: studying the direct and indirect effects of emotions on information technology use. MIS Quarterly 34, 689-710 (2010)
21. Nikken, P., Schols, M.: How and why parents guide the media use of young children. Journal of Child and Family Studies 24, 3423-3435 (2015)
22. Warren, R.: In words and deeds: Parental involvement and mediation of children’s television viewing. The Journal of Family Communication 1, 211-231 (2001)
23. Nathanson, A.I.: Mediation of children’s television viewing: Working toward conceptual clarity and common understanding. Annals of the International Communication Association 25, 115-151 (2001)
24. Krcmar, M., Cingel, D.P.: Examining two theoretical models predicting American and Dutch parents’ mediation of adolescent social media use. Journal of Family Communication 16, 247-262 (2016)
25. Valkenburg, P.M., Piotrowski, J.T., Hermanns, J., De Leeuw, R.: Developing and validating the perceived parental media mediation scale: A self-determination perspective. Human Communication Research 39, 445-469 (2013)
26. Tam, K.Y., Ho, S.Y.: Understanding the impact of web personalization on user information processing and decision outcomes. MIS Quarterly 30, 865-890 (2006)
27. Montag, C., Lachmann, B., Herrlich, M., Zweig, K.: Addictive Features of Social Media/Messenger Platforms and Freemium Games against the Background of Psychological and Economic Theories. International journal of environmental research and public health 16, 2612 (2019)
28. Gorlenko, L., Merrick, R.: No wires attached: Usability challenges in the connected mobile world. IBM Systems Journal 42, 639-651 (2003)
29. Cingel, D.P., Krcmar, M.: Predicting media use in very young children: The role of demographics and parent attitudes. Communication Studies 64, 374-394 (2013)
30. Lauricella, A.R., Wartella, E., Rideout, V.J.: Young children’s screen time: The complex role of parent and child factors. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology 36, 11-17 (2015)
31. Ajzen, I., Fishbein, M.: Scaling and testing multiplicative combinations in the expectancy– value model of attitudes. Journal of Applied Social Psychology 38, 2222-2247 (2008)
32. Livingstone, S., Bober, M.: Regulating the internet at home: contrasting the perspectives of children and parents. In: Buckingham, D., Willett, R. (eds.) Digital generations: Children, young people, and new media, pp. 93-113. Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah, N.J. (2006)
33. Padilla-Walker, L.M.: “Peers I can monitor, it’s media that really worries me!” Parental cognitions as predictors of proactive parental strategy choice. Journal of Adolescent Research 21, 56-82 (2006)
34. McCloskey, M., Johnson, S.L., Benz, C., Thompson, D.A., Chamberlin, B., Clark, L., Bellows, L.L.: Parent perceptions of mobile device use among preschool-aged children in rural Head Start centers. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior 50, 83-89 (2018)
35. Genc, Z.G.: Parents’ perceptions about the mobile technology use of preschool aged children. Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences 146, 55-60 (2014)
36. Bae, S.-M.: The relationship between smartphone use for communication, social capital, and subjective well-being in Korean adolescents: Verification using multiple latent growth modeling. Children and Youth Services Review 96, 93-99 (2019)
37. Kwok, K., Ghrear, S., Li, V., Haddock, T., Coleman, P., Birch, S.A.: Children can learn new facts equally well from interactive media versus face to face instruction. Frontiers in psychology 7, 1603 (2016)
38. Radesky, J.S., Eisenberg, S., Kistin, C.J., Gross, J., Block, G., Zuckerman, B., Silverstein, M.: Overstimulated consumers or next-generation learners? Parent tensions about child mobile technology use. The Annals of Family Medicine 14, 503-508 (2016)
39. Jia, R., Steelman, Z.R., Reich, B.H.: Using Mechanical Turk Data in IS Research: Risks, Rewards, and Recommendations. CAIS 41, 301-318 (2017)
40. Strauss, A., Corbin, J.: Basics of Qualitative Research: Grounded Theory Procedures and Techniques. Sage Publications, Newbury Park, CA (1990)
41. Jordan, A.: The role of media in children’s development: An ecological perspective. Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics 25, 196-206 (2004)
42. Ginsburg, K.R.: The importance of play in promoting healthy child development and maintaining strong parent-child bonds. Pediatrics 119, 182-191 (2007)
43. Livingstone, S., Kirwil, L., Ponte, C., Staksrud, E.: In their own words: What bothers children online? European Journal of Communication 29, 271-288 (2014)
44. Kirilenko, A.P., Stepchenkova, S.: Inter-coder agreement in one-to-many classification: fuzzy kappa. PloS one 11, e0149787 (2016)
45. Barnes, S.J., Pressey, A.D., Scornavacca, E.: Mobile ubiquity: Understanding the relationship between cognitive absorption, smartphone addiction and social network services. Computers in Human Behavior 90, 246-258 (2019)
46. Duckworth, A.L., Gendler, T.S., Gross, J.J.: Situational Strategies for Self-Control. Perspectives on Psychological Science 11, 35-55 (2016)
47. Bronfenbrenner, U.: Ecological models of human development. Readings on the development of children 2, 37-43 (1994)
48. Slovic, P.: Perception of risk. Science 236, 280-285 (1987)
49. Austvoll‐Dahlgren, A., Helseth, S.: What informs parents’ decision‐making about childhood vaccinations? Journal of Advanced Nursing 66, 2421-2430 (2010)
50. Radesky, J.S., Schumacher, J., Zuckerman, B.: Mobile and interactive media use by young children: the good, the bad, and the unknown. Pediatrics 135, 1-3 (2015)
51. Singer, D.G., Singer, J.L.: Handbook of children and the media. Sage, London (2012)
52. Cho, J.Y., Kim, T., Lee, B.G.: Effective Parental Mediation for the Right Use of Smartphones in Early Childhood. International Information Institute (Tokyo). Information 19, 365-372 (2016)
53. Lowry, P.B., D’Arcy, J., Hammer, B., Moody, G.D.: “Cargo Cult” science in traditional organization and information systems survey research: A case for using nontraditional methods of data collection, including Mechanical Turk and online panels. The Journal of Strategic Information Systems 25, 232-240 (2016)
54. Havighurst, R.J.: Developmental tasks and education. Basic Books, New York (1972)

Most viewed articles

Meist angesehene Beiträge

GITO events | library.gito