Let’s Travel the World Together: Toward an Understanding of Motivational Antecedents in Business Trip Ridesharing Services

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						@Select Types{,
							 
							 
							 
							 
							 
							Journal   = "Band-1",
							 Title= "Let’s Travel the World Together: Toward an Understanding of Motivational Antecedents in Business Trip Ridesharing Services", 
							Author= "Bernd Herrenkind, Tim-Benjamin Lembcke, Stephan Diederich, Simon Trang, and Lutz M. Kolbe", 
							Doi= "https://doi.org/10.30844/wi_2020_n3-herrenkind", 
							 Abstract= "Regarding current climate change concerns and expanding urbanization, the transport sector is expected to increasingly contribute to climate protection. A promising endeavor, in response to this, is to meet the increased mobility requirements with lower transportation means, thus augmenting the efficiency of transportation. One particularly promising approach to cut corporate-level CO2 emissions is to foster Business Trip Ridesharing (BTRS), allowing employees to jointly travel and commute. This article analyzes the underlying motivational factors correlated with adopting BTRS. Using the Self-Determination Theory, we examine intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting employees’ attitude and behavioral intention toward BTRS. Drawing on a sample from a real-world German company, our partial least square analysis indicates that enjoyment, economical viability and especially sustainability are important antecedents to foster BTRS. In summation, we discuss an integrated approach that addresses multiple motivational dispositions and provide several practical suggestions, in addition to the areas of future research.

", 
							 Keywords= "Business Trip Ridesharing, Sharing Economy, Self-Determination Theory, Green IS, Mobility-as-a-Service.
", 
							}
					
Bernd Herrenkind, Tim-Benjamin Lembcke, Stephan Diederich, Simon Trang, and Lutz M. Kolbe: Let’s Travel the World Together: Toward an Understanding of Motivational Antecedents in Business Trip Ridesharing Services. Online: https://doi.org/10.30844/wi_2020_n3-herrenkind (Abgerufen 28.02.24)

Abstract

Abstract

Regarding current climate change concerns and expanding urbanization, the transport sector is expected to increasingly contribute to climate protection. A promising endeavor, in response to this, is to meet the increased mobility requirements with lower transportation means, thus augmenting the efficiency of transportation. One particularly promising approach to cut corporate-level CO2 emissions is to foster Business Trip Ridesharing (BTRS), allowing employees to jointly travel and commute. This article analyzes the underlying motivational factors correlated with adopting BTRS. Using the Self-Determination Theory, we examine intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting employees’ attitude and behavioral intention toward BTRS. Drawing on a sample from a real-world German company, our partial least square analysis indicates that enjoyment, economical viability and especially sustainability are important antecedents to foster BTRS. In summation, we discuss an integrated approach that addresses multiple motivational dispositions and provide several practical suggestions, in addition to the areas of future research.

Keywords

Schlüsselwörter

Business Trip Ridesharing, Sharing Economy, Self-Determination Theory, Green IS, Mobility-as-a-Service.

References

Referenzen

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