Industry 4.0 Science 40, 2024, 70-75
Sustainable Food Supply Chains Through Artificial Intelligence – Conceptual visualization using the example of turkeys to promote animal welfare and food quality

Bibtex

Cite as text

						@Article{Köters+Schürmeyer+Prange,
							Cite-key = "Koeters2024Sus", 
							Year= "2024", 
							Number= "1", 
							 Volume= "Industry 4.0 Science 40", 
							Pages= "70-75", 
							Journal   = "Industry 4.0 Science",
							 Title= "Sustainable Food Supply Chains Through Artificial Intelligence – Conceptual visualization using the example of turkeys to promote animal welfare and food quality", 
							Author= "Corinna Köters, Hochschule Niederrhein University of Applied Sciences and Witten/Herdecke University; Maik Schürmeyer, Hochschule Niederrhein University
of Applied Sciences; Alexander Prange, Hochschule Niederrhein University of Applied Sciences and Witten/Herdecke University", 
							Doi= "https://doi.org/10.30844/I4SE.24.1.70", 
							 Abstract= "The concept visualizes a sustainable food supply chain through the use of artificial intelligence, using the example of turkeys to promote animal welfare and food quality. The technology push through artificial intelligence
along the food supply chain is identified as a driver. In terms of market pull, it becomes clear that stakeholders are demanding transparency and the avoidance of food waste. The focus is on the parameters of production processes, use of resources and deriving possible positive effects. The target group comprises stakeholders in the food supply chain and includes producers at the processing and production stages, distributors, retailers
and consumers.", 
							 Keywords= "sustainable food supply chain,
transparency, food waste awareness, artificial intelligence, AI, interoperability", 
							}
					
Corinna Köters, Hochschule Niederrhein University of Applied Sciences and Witten/Herdecke University; Maik Schürmeyer, Hochschule Niederrhein University
of Applied Sciences; Alexander Prange, Hochschule Niederrhein University of Applied Sciences and Witten/Herdecke University(2024): Sustainable Food Supply Chains Through Artificial Intelligence – Conceptual visualization using the example of turkeys to promote animal welfare and food quality. Industry 4.0 Science 401(2024), S. 70-75. Online: https://doi.org/10.30844/I4SE.24.1.70 (Abgerufen 23.05.24)

Abstract

Abstract

The concept visualizes a sustainable food supply chain through the use of artificial intelligence, using the example of turkeys to promote animal welfare and food quality. The technology push through artificial intelligence along the food supply chain is identified as a driver. In terms of market pull, it becomes clear that stakeholders are demanding transparency and the avoidance of food waste. The focus is on the parameters of production processes, use of resources and deriving possible positive effects. The target group comprises stakeholders in the food supply chain and includes producers at the processing and production stages, distributors, retailers and consumers.

Keywords

Schlüsselwörter

sustainable food supply chain, transparency, food waste awareness, artificial intelligence, AI, interoperability

References

Referenzen

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